about skeet

The Skeet field...
A skeet field has eight shooting stations and two trap houses.  Seven of the stations are arranged in a half moon between the two trap houses, and one station is directly between them.  The high house, on the left side of the field, throws its targets from a trap 10 feet above the ground.  The target rises to a height of 15 feet by the time it travels to the center of the field.  The low house target, on the right side, leaves the trap house just 3-1/2 feet from the ground.  It also rises to a height of 15 feet by the time it reaches the center of the field.

How Skeet is played…
A round of skeet consists of 25 targets, with 17 shot as singles and 8 as doubles.  The first miss is repeated immediately and is called an option.  If no targets are missed during the round, the last or 25th target is shot at the last station, low house 8.  The shooting sequence is as follows:

  • Stations 1 and 2 - High house single, followed by Low house single, followed by High house/Low house pair.
  • Stations 3, 4, and 5 - High house single, followed by Low house single
  • Stations 6 and 7 - High house single, followed by Low house single, followed by Low house/High house pair
  • Station 8 - High house single, followed by Low house single

Skeet is shot in squads of up to five shooters. The squad moves from station to station sequentially around the half moon.  Finally ending up in the center (station 8), at the end of the round. 

Any gauge shotgun may be used, of any type, as long as it can fire at least two shots.  The preferred shot size is #9, but nothing larger than 7-1/2 should ever be used. 

For more information on how to play the game of Skeet please visit the “New to Skeet Shooting” section on the National Skeet Shooting Association website.

For all you waterfowl or upland bird hunters, Skeet is great practice if you have a desire to improve your shooting accuracy for hunting!

Please refer to the official rules and regulations of skeet, as administered by the National Skeet Shooting Association, if you have any questions.

** Thanks to the NSSA website for this description.